Paris 16th district Porte d'Auteuil

Porte d’Auteil

Paris 16th Auteuil

To the southwest of the 16th arrondissement is the Auteuil neighborhood, bordered by Boulevard Suchet and Boulevard Murat to the west, by the banks of the Seine to the east, by the rue du Ranelagh to the north and by the ring road to the south. Auteuil village was as has been previously mentioned was the first village to the west of Paris. The lords of Auteuil were the Genovéfains religious order who erected gibbets where we now find the Porte de St Cloud. The name Auteuil (which means "clearing") appears for the first time in 1109; Notre-Dame church dominated the village from its high Romanesque bell tower. The monastery and church were demolished at the end of the 19th century.

Poet, translator and literary critic Nicolas Boileau's presence in Auteuil is noteworthy. He bought a house in 1685 not far from the church (today 26 rue Boileau) and stayed for over 25 years. Racine was one of his neighbors, and the scholars were very close: Racine often entrusted him with his children.

The Bois de Boulogne is just behind Porte d'Auteuil. In the neighborhood are the home to the French Open Roland Garros (http://www.nouveaurolandgarros.com/), Auteuil Racecourse (http://www.france-galop.com/fr/hippodromeauteuil), Jean Bouin stadium (http://www.stade.fr/), Auteuil Greenhouses (https://www.parisinfo.com/musee-monument-paris/71157/Jardin-des-serres -d-Auteuil-Garden-Botanical-of-Paris) and “Village d’Auteuil”.

55% of properties are one and two-bed apartments, and the other 45% upmarket 3 + room family apartments for executives and wealthy families. The price/sqm is over 10,000 euro for over three quarters of these properties (Source Efficity).

Auteuil is a very pleasant neighborhood, with a wealthy and often somewhat elderly population. Though less lively than the centre of the capital, Village d'Auteuil is nonetheless dynamic.
Porte de St-Cloud

Porte de St-Cloud

The Porte de Saint-Cloud neighborhood is the most southerly part of the capital’s 16th arrondissement. It is bordered by the Seine, the ring road, rue Molitor and rue Mirabeau.

The neighborhood gets its name from the major road junction and nearby Saint-Cloud, itself named after the grandson of Clovis who refused accession to the throne to become a priest.

Despite its convenient location, this neighborhood is one of the most affordable in the 16th arrondissement and appeals to families looking for upmarket apartments.
Boulevard Exelmans

Boulevard Exelmans

This boulevard was created in 1862-1863 at the same time as the viaduct which ran along the middle. The viaduct was bombed in 1943 and demolished in 1960.

The Exelmans neighborhood is particularly sought-after by families owing to its proximity to many schools. There is the Parc des Princes nursery and primary school (http://www.education.gouv.fr/annuaire/75-paris/paris-16e/etab/ecole-maternelle-publique-parc-des-princes.html), the Claude Bernard Collège and Lycée (https://www.ac-paris.fr/serail/jcms/s2_544112/en/accueil) as well as Jean de la Fontaine Lycée (https: //www.ac-paris.en/serail/JCMS/p2_73053/en/Home). The European Business School Paris (http://www.ebs-paris.fr/ecole-management/) offers an internationally-oriented course.

The neighborhood also boasts the renowned Molitor Swimming Pool (http://www.mltr.com/) Created in 1929, this was inaugurated by Olympic medalists Aileen Riggin Soule and Johny Weissmuller. Renowned for its remarkable Art Deco style, it witnessed the first appearance of the bikini after 1945. Nicknamed "the white liner", it was closed in 1989 for a 25-year long renovation. Inaugurated in May 2014 and today a luxury Hotel-Spa, it is located at 13 rue Nungesser et Coli 75016 Paris (www.mgallery.com/Paris_Molitor) A historical and relaxing rendezvous for watersports enthusiasts.

In the immediate vicinity, football fans head for the Parc des Princes (https://www.psg.fr/)

Tennis enthusiasts on the other hand head for legendary Roland Garros at 2 Avenue Gordon Bennett, which hosts the French Open each May.
Avenue de Versailles

Avenue de Versailles

Formerly Route de Versailles or Route de la Reine, the avenue got its current name in 1877. The Avenue de Versailles and its surrounding streets offer many prestigious apartments overlooking the Seine. A very dynamic area with many restaurants, it also features the René Cassin lycée professionnel and a Tennis Club (https://www.tc16.fr/)
Pont Mirabeau

Pont Mirabeau

The bridge that gives its name to the neighborhood was built between 1894 and 1897. On the banks of the Seine and near Sainte-Périne Park, the area is popular with families who appreciate the leafy environment. Also nearby is the Sainte-Périne-Rossini-Chardon Lagache Hospital (https://www.aphp.fr/contenu/hopital-sainte-perine-1) and the IUT Paris Descartes (http: // www. iut.parisdescartes.fr/). Ste Périne hospital was originally the residence of the Génovéfins d'Auteuil. With the Revolution it passed to the state and subsequently had several owners until 1809 when it was acquired by artist Baron Gerard. In 1856 his heirs split the ensemble, and Chardon-Lagache, Ste Périne and the Rossini Foundation were founded thanks to a legacy from the composer who lived in Auteuil’s avenue Ingres.
Avenue Mozart, Bld de Montmorency and Bld Beausejour

Avenue Mozart, Bld de Montmorency and Bld Beausejour

Avenue Mozart was opened in 1867 and extended in 1896 to beyond rue Boislevent. To build the railway extension to Passy and Neuilly, the substantial Montmorency-Boufflers property was acquired to house Auteuil station in 1853. The home of the Goncourt brothers is in the vicinity. Boulevard de Beauséjour was opened in 1853 also during the construction of the railway. It bordered Beauséjour Park which Avenue Mozart Avenue sliced in two in 1867. This park, which had replaced the royal stables in the seventeenth century, was scattered with little houses hidden in the greenery. The Père Lachaise, Mme Recamier and Chateaubriand all lived here at some time, along with Rossini, Ampère and the Marquise d'Aguesseau. After 1867, the park was built upon. Alphand died in 1891 at n° 7, Albert Lebrun in 1950 at n° 19 and Henri Bergson in 1941 at n° 47. The neighborhood’s beautiful buildings contain superb apartments.