Paris 16th district Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo

Paris 16th arrondissement Victor Hugo

In 1825 during the Restoration the “Passy plain” was subdivided; the future Avenue Victor Hugo was created, bearing the name of Charles X, then King of France. After the July Revolution it became Avenue St Cloud until1864, and then Avenue Eylau until 1881. N° 14 was home to Guy de Maupassant until his death in 1893. At n° 124 was Victor Hugo’s house where he died on May 22, 1885. At n°6 a racecourse had existed since 1857. It was demolished 20 years later to allow the passage of rue de Sontay. St Honoré d'Eylau Church was built in 1855. To the north of the 16th arrondissement, the Victor Hugo neighborhood from the Bois de Boulogne to Place de l'Étoile boasts exceptional properties. Haussmannian buildings and also more recent residences boast superb top-floor apartments commanding views of the Eiffel Tower. In the heart of the avenue is the Ecole Supérieure de Gestion, more commonly known as the ISG. The prestigious Paris-Dauphine University is also in the neighborhood.
Place Victor Hugo

Place Victor Hugo

Place Victor Hugo was created at the same time as the avenue and successively bore several different names. It boasts several gourmet restaurants such as the Vinci (23 rue Paul Valery 75116 Paris), theatres such as the Grande Crypte (http://lagrandecrypte.com/) as well as Jeu de Paume and Squash clubs. In this area we also find the Saint-Honoré d'Eylau private school.
Avenue Henri Martin

Avenue Henri Martin

Avenue Henri Martin dates from 1858 when it was known as Avenue de l'Empereur, to become Avenue du Trocadéro from 1877 to 1885 before adopting the name of the renowned historian. Caran d'Ache lived at n° 31. Between n° 107 and 113 was the chalet de Lamartine, offered by the city of Paris to the writer; he died here on February 28th 1869, and the chalet was demolished 10 years later. The Countess Anna de Noailles lived at n° 109 until 1910.

The avenue is particularly appreciated by families. On the edge of the Bois de Boulogne is the Henri de Montherlant swimming pool (http://equipement.paris.fr/piscine-henry-de-montherlant-2939) and the private Pascal School (http://www.ecolepascal.fr/)
Avenue Raymond Poincare

Avenue Raymond Poincare

Opened in 1826 with the name St Denis, this became avenue Malakoff in 1864. With the death of the former President of the Republic in 1934, the avenue was renamed. Between Avenue Raymond Poincaré and Rue de la Pompe we find the renowned Janson de Sailly Lycée (http://www.janson-de-sailly.fr/). The private Catholic high school Passy Saint-Honoré (https://www.passy-st-honore.eu/) is also here.
Etoile

Etoile

Place de l'Etoile is set on what was a hillock known as Roule, leveled in 1768 by Perronet so that "the gradient was equal from Place Louis XV to Neuilly Bridge". The earth removed (some 5 meters in height) was used to fill the Champs-Elysees, at the time an uneven and somewhat breakneck track. As early as the 1730’s the hillock was known as "The Chaillot Star". Construction of the Arc de Triomphe began in 1806 and completed in 1836. In 1854 the current plan of the square was defined, and three years later seven new arteries were opened to bring them up to 12 in all. In 1858 when Hittorf constructed twelve private mansions with a symmetrical architecture these were criticized because their height was considered insufficient. The current name dates from 1863. The Commune used the Arc de Triomphe to store gunpowder and installed five pieces of artillery; the site suffered somewhat during this period. The Unknown Soldier was buried there on January 28th 1921.

With Place Charles-de-Gaule - Étoile accessing the Champs-Elysées, the Etoile neighborhood is today among the capital’s most emblematic landmarks.

From the studio apartment to the 4/5 room apartment, from the private house with a garden to the unique Hotel Particulier, our agents look forward to accompanying you for a visit to truly prestigious realty.