Paris 16th district Muette

Muette

Paris 16th Muette

Located towards the centre of the 16th arrondissement and near the Bois de Boulogne, the Muette neighborhood is much appreciated by executives and their families. This dynamic neighborhood is bordered by rue de la Pompe, rue de l'Assomption, the ring road and Avenue Henri Martin. The name comes from the former Château de la Muette, a Royal hunting lodge where the pack of hounds gathered (hence its name, from “meute”). Charles IX had built this little chateau which was passed on to Marguerite de Valois and Louis XIII. Catelan, captain of Louis XIV's hunts, lodged here. He passed it on to the Duchess de Berry, daughter of the Regent, who extended it at the expense of the Bois de Boulogne. Louis XV had it reconstructed, and entrusted it to the Marquise de Pompadour. Finally it was acquired by the Dauphine Marie Antoinette. After the Revolution it was in poor condition, but was nonetheless acquired by the piano-maker Erard in 1822. Dismantled and finally demolished, it disappeared in 1920. A neo-Gabriel castle was rebuilt a few years later, and this became the headquarters of the OECD.

This neighborhood boasts a wealth of upmarket realty, including top floor apartments overlooking Ranelagh Gardens or with views of the Bois de Boulogne.
Avenue de Ranelagh

Avenue de Ranelagh

Lord Ranelagh was an eighteenth-century music lover renowned for the free concerts he organized in Chelsea Park. Little musical events were also hosted on the lawns of La Muette, and the gardens adopted the name Petit Ranelagh in homage to the now deceased peer. The gardens had a restaurant and a ballroom; on April 21st 1780, Queen Marie Antoinette when staying in the Chateau de la Muette came to dance with the Comte d'Artois (the future Charles X). After the chaos of the Revolution, the gardens once more became fashionable during the Directoire period. Later the Duchess of Berry frequented the Petit Ranelagh, strengthening its reputation. However, from 1840 the construction of a railway line sealed the fate of Petit Ranelagh, and it closed in 1856. Its grounds became avenues Ingres and Prudhon and the surrounding streets. The ballroom itself was at 26 Avenue Raphael.

The Ranelagh neighborhood, located between Ranelagh Gardens and the Bois de Boulogne, is keenly sought-after thanks to its calm and its beautiful views. Many embassies have chosen the neighborhood which boasts some magnificent properties. The Marmottan-Monet Museum (http://www.marmottan.fr/) is here, along with the restaurant la Gare (http://restaurantlagare.com/).
Rue du Ranelagh

Rue du Ranelagh

Created between 1824 and 1867, this artery boasts spacious family apartments in fine Haussmannian buildings. The Molière complex offers a complete school curriculum: College, High School, and Preparatory Class for the “Grandes Ecoles”.
Rue de la Pompe

Rue de la Pompe

Known in 1730 as Vieux-Chemin, it ran along the walls of Château de la Muette and was near the pump that supplied water to the castle. Shortly before the Revolution it was logically named after this pump. At n° 43 is the location of a hotel particulier inhabited from 1825 by Las Cases until his death in 1842. The arrondissement’s Town Hall is at n° 73. At n° 89, a bookshop was managed from 1940 to 1942 by Pierre Brossolette. The Lycée Janson-de-Sailly, whose first stone was laid by Jules Ferry on October 15th 1881 is at n° 106. Janson-de-Sailly himself left some 3 million to finance the construction. Numerous activities are to be found around rue de la Pompe. The best known is probably Michelin-starred Alain Ducasse’s Ecole de Cuisine. Lovers of fine wine head for Wine Dominus.

Beautiful and spacious family apartments in fine Haussmannian buildings are numerous.
Rue de Passy

Rue de Passy

Old Passy village’s main street, this was in 1488 known as chemin de la Folie, and in the 17th century as Grande Rue (de Passy). For a short period it became rue Marat, to finally adopt its current name in 1867. It was until the middle of the 19th century one of Passy’s grand total of 4 paved streets (along with rue de l’Eglise, rue Basse and rue Bois-le-vent). A number of private mansions were built, several still exist but some have disappeared. For example at n° 7 stood a property occupied by General Moreau: it was demolished in 1909. At n°12: a property occupied by Joseph Proudhon from 1861 until his death in 1865. At n°18: the location of the Hotel de la Folie rented from 1761 by Louis XV to house his mistress Anne de Romans with whom he had in 1762 a son. Baptized in Passy with the name "son of Louis Bourbon", he was another in the long list of Louis XIV and Louis XV’s illegitimate children. The private mansion was demolished in 1890 to make way for rue Claude-Chahu. At n° 67: Passy’s 2nd town hall; installed on January 1st, 1836 to replace its predecessor at n° 3, rue Franklin. In 1877, Passy Town Hall became the arrondissement’s Town Hall, and in 1860 was transferred to Avenue Henri Martin.

At n° 80: the previous location of the Hotel de Bondeville hotel, which disappeared with the appearance of avenue Paul Doumer. Paul Claudel lived in the new building built to replace it when he was ambassador in Washington.

Numerous upmarket apartments are to be found here.
Rue Pergolese

Rue Pergolese

Previously rue Périer and rue du Petit Parc, this ran beside the Chateau de la Muette’s pheasant farm. A carriageway from 1825, each part became respectively Spontini and Pergolese in 1865. At n° 60, from 1840 to 1893 a large building known previously as Skating-Ring and then renamed Gran Plaza de Toros for the 1889 Fair stood here. Today, it has been covered by rue Lalo.