Paris 17th district Batignolles

Batignolles

Paris 17th arrondissement Batignolles

Batignolles, originally a village that became Batignolles-Monceau, is the 17th arrondissement’s smallest neighborhood. Mainly made up of quite narrow streets, it has kept to some extent its village atmosphere and draws young executives with children. Greenery and outdoor markets contribute to the neighborhood’s pleasant ambiance.

Over the past years, major redevelopment has been undertaken, including the creation of the Cité Judiciaire de Paris.
Rue des Batignolles

Rue des Batignolles

Rue des Batignolles was called rue de l'Eglise in 1828; in 1847 it was prolonged by the Rue de l'Hotel de Ville. They merged in 1868. At number 18 was Batignolles Town Hall, built in 1847 and which became in 1860 the arrondissements Town Hall. Extended over the years, it sadly lost its remarkable bell tower in 1952. Rue des Batignolles accesses the neighborhood of the same name, the former village of Batignolles which is particularly appreciated by Parisians. It ends at the Church with its lively square and one of the neighborhood’s largest areas of greenery; Square des Batignolles. In the evening, this authentic street comes to life bringing together people of all ages.
Boulevard des Batignolles

Boulevard des Batignolles

This was formed in 1863 by the transformation of the Clichy walkway that ran along the “Mur des fermiers généraux”. The middle of this wide two-way road is planted with trees, some centennial. At number 34 is a popular organic market and at number 78 bis the renowned Théâtre Hébertot built in 1828. At the location of number 43 was the 331-meter long Batignolles railway tunnel. Here in October 1921 two trains collided - 28 were killed and 74 wounded. The tunnel was removed shortly after. In 1820 the restaurant Aux Barreaux was at number 104.
Rue des Dames and rue Legendre

Rue des Dames and rue Legendre

The Rue des Dames was the old road which from 1672 led to the Dames de Montmartre Abbey; the rue Legendre, more recent, was opened in 1846 with the name rue d'Orléans. Extended from 1865, it got the name of the renowned mathematician Legendre in 1867. The Chateau de Monceau was at the location of number 22. These two streets benefits from many shops, and are both pleasant and affordable. Maurice Barres, writer and French politician, lived at 12 rue Legendre. At number 53 rue des Dames is an unusual building reminiscent of an old theater. It is in fact the very first Electricity Production Center dating back to 1889.